Children and older adults are set to be included in expanded trials on a potential COVID-19 vaccine under development in Oxford.

In April, 1,000 healthy adults under the age of 55 participated in the first phase of vaccine trials conducted by a research team based at the University of Oxford.

The next phase of trials will involve more than 10,200 participants, including adults aged over 70 and children aged between five and 12, being enrolled in the study to test the impact of the potential coronavirus vaccine on their immune system.

Children and older adults are set to be included in expanded trials on a potential COVID-19 vaccine under development in Oxford.

Participants in the trial will be injected with one or two doses of either the vaccine under development — ChAdOx1 nXoV-19 — or another licensed control vaccine.

The number of infections in both groups will then be compared by researchers in a process that could take between two to six months, depending on the number of people exposed to COVID-19.

Before human trials began, the vaccine was tested on monkeys, and appeared to give them protection against COVID-19.

In April, 1,000 healthy adults under the age of 55 participated in the first phase of vaccine trials conducted by a research team based at the University of Oxford. Pic: THIBAULT SAVARY/AFP via Getty Images

Speaking to The Telegraph in April, the research team based at Oxford stated: ‘The best-case scenario is that by the autumn of 2020 we have the results about the effectiveness of the vaccine from a phase III trial and the ability to manufacture large amounts of the vaccine’.

The team has recognised that this goal is ‘highly ambitious’, and multiple obstacles could prevent the realisation of this optimistic timeline.

Caveats about the proximity of a vaccine have been issued repeatedly by the UK Government and other medical experts, who have estimated that manufacturing and developing a vaccine could take 12 to 18 months.

Meanwhile, across Europe, governments have been rolling out antibody testing to determine the proportion of the population that has been exposed to COVID-19. Pic: Peter KovalevTASS via Getty Images

Meanwhile, across Europe, governments have been rolling out antibody testing to determine the proportion of the population that has been exposed to COVID-19.

Plans are underway in Ireland to ask some 5,000 randomly selected people to volunteer for repeated serological or antibody tests over the coming year as public health authorities seek to identify those who may have been infected with coronavirus but who may not have presented with symptoms.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here